All posts tagged programming

Episode 56: Google Glass

On this episode, we lament that Google Glass doesn’t allow for augmented reality.  We discuss what we’d like in real augmented reality, how it would improve our lives, and how augmented reality could improve gaming.  Then we digress into debating whether or not we’d allow wires in our brain. Click here to listen!

Partial Transcript: Episode 35 (RFID Tracking in Schools)

Andrew: So there was a high school girl.  Her family had an issue with the whole RFID tags and tracking where you go in the school.  So, the school told her that she couldn’t go to school. Nick: The family sued the school because they said that they had a religious objection to being tracked.  Their problem with the RFID chips because they were “the mark of the beast.” Virginia: Read More...

Episode 35: RFID Tracking in Schools

Today we talk about the RFID chip showdown that took place last fall at a San Antonio school.  We discuss how to game the system, how RFID’s work outside of school grounds, implications for correlating school badge data in malls or other public places, and whether or not requiring students to wear ID badges is even effective. Click here to listen!

Partial Transcript: Episode 34 (Indie game developer Thom Robertson)

Virginia: Can you tell me about your time in Aggieland?  That’s my alma mater. Thom: I initially came to College Station with a buddy who was getting a job there.  Later, in 1992, I picked up my first video game industry in College Station. Virginia: I didn’t even know there was a video game industry in College Station. Thom: It’s my experience that basically every college  town has one or Read More...

Episode 34: Indie game developer Thom Robertson

Today on Nerd Absurd we’re talking to Thom Robertson, the indie developer of the game “Artemis: Spaceship Bridge Simulator.”  He shares all the details of working in the game industry, his current lifestyle as a game developer and how he thinks of new ideas for games.  He spills his top three projects for the next release of Artemis, and he tells us about some of his greatest moments as a Read More...

Episode 33: The death of Aaron Swartz

Today we mourn the passing of Aaron Swartz.  We talk about his accomplishments and what they mean to the web.  We talk about how the government approaches technology and hacking laws.  Finally, we talk about ways to stop this from happening again. Click here to listen!

Episode 32: Emile Patrone of Tindie

Today we interview Emile Patrone, the creator of Tindie.  Tindie is a site for home creators to sell their own electronics projects, much like the site Etsy, which helps artists sell their wares.  Emile tells us about how he came up with the idea, how he manages his day-to-day life, and the milestones he’s encountered in building his dream. To learn more, check out Tindie.com or follow on Facebook or Read More...

Partial transcript: Episode 32 (Emile Patron of Tindie)

Andrew: We should get into a little detail before we get Emile on the phone.  Tindie is basically Etsy for electronics. Nick: Built hardware. Mike: And he’s started doing Kickstarter-type stuff. Virginia: Are we ready to patch him in? Emile: Hello! Nick: Hey there!  We’re all makers, so we have a little bit of knowledge about the stuff you’re trying to do. Virginia: We read the Reddit background where you Read More...

Partial Transcript: Episode 11 (Tablets in Ethiopia)

Virginia: One Laptop per Child dropped off a tablet computer with preloaded programs.  The goal was to see if kids without any knowledge of computers or reading could figure out how to work these things.  It turns out that within a month, they had basically schooled the tablet and had been able to do anything. Nick: They had no access to written words? Andrew: They had a literacy rate of Read More...

Online education is set to change the world

I don’t know about the rest of the web, but the idea of having cheap, easy access to world-class instruction is the most exciting thing since Netflix.  There’s still a lot of bugs to work out: So far, tearing down the paywalls around higher education has been the simple part. What’s more challenging is making online classes like “A History of the World Since 1300” and “Algorithms I” match the Read More...